How Can My Benefits Be Revoked?

When it comes to receiving social security benefits, the process can be long and arduous, depending on your circumstances. Especially if you are applying for disability benefits, the path to getting them can be difficult. For many SSD recipients, however, they feel that once the benefits have been approved, that the process is over. Unfortunately, this is not the case. When it comes to social security disability benefits, the SSA may look at your case and, in certain circumstances, revoke your status. But what can disqualify you from getting your benefits? There are several reasons the Administration may reverse payments as listed below.

Re-Entering the Workforce

When determining your disability benefits, the SSA uses something called your Residual Functional Capacity (RFC) to determine if you can work, and what type of work you can perform. If for whatever reason, you get a job that does not match your RFC rating, the Administration may stop benefits under the belief that you no longer qualify. If you are going to re-enter the workforce and don’t know if it could disqualify you, consult your local Social Security disability lawyer in Cleveland, Ohio. An attorney can help you determine if your job will revoke your benefits.

No Longer Disabled

Depending on the severity of your disability, you may be able to improve your RFC rating over time. Especially if your affliction is relatively temporary (such as broken bones or other serious injuries), you may only qualify to receive benefits for as long as you are afflicted. Every so often, the Administration will send representatives to determine if you are still suffering from the disability, or if your situation has improved. If the agent deems that you are now fit for work, your benefits could be revoked.

Incarceration

If for any reason, you are put in jail while receiving your SSD benefits, the Administration will suspend them for the duration of your stay, possibly indefinitely. Depending on the situation, you may lose your benefits entirely, or you may be able to receive them after you get out of jail. However, if you are only jailed for less than thirty days, you may not get a suspension at all.

If you think your benefits may be revoked, or you may be coming into a situation that could reverse your benefits (such as re-entering the workforce), contact a Social Security lawyer in Cleveland, Ohio. A lawyer can answer your questions as well as assist you in dealing with the Administration in case anything happens.

Be the first to like.

Share!
    Shares
    Share This